Run-On Errors

A run-on sentence, might just seem like a type of sentence that goes on and on without a clear point. It is. A run-on is when two or more independent clauses fuse together without using punctuation to separate them.

For example:

  • Incorrect: Every day, millions of children go to daycare with millions of other kids there is no guarantee that none of them are harboring infectious conditions.
  • Incorrect: Many daycare centers have strict rules about sick children needing to stay away until they are no longer infectious but enforcing those rules can be very difficult.
  • Incorrect: Daycare providers often undergo extreme pressure to accept a sick child "just this once" the parent has no other care options and cannot miss work.

You can make two complete sentences by inserting a period. You can use a semicolon between the two clauses if they are of equal importance; this allows your reader to consider the points together. You can use a semicolon with a transition word to indicate a specific relation between the two clauses; however, you should use this sparingly. You can use a coordinating conjunction and a comma, and this also will indicate a relationship. Or, you can add a word to one clause to make it dependent.

For example:
  • Correct: Every day, millions of children go to daycare with millions of other kids. There is no guarantee that none of them are harboring infectious conditions.
  • Correct: Many daycares have strict rules about sick children needing to stay away until they are no longer infectious; however, enforcing those rules can be very difficult.
  • Correct: Many daycares have strict rules about sick children needing to stay away until they are no longer infectious, but enforcing those rules can be very difficult.
  • Correct: Daycare providers often undergo extreme pressure to accept a sick child "just this once" because the parent has no other care options and cannot miss work.

 

How to Become a Better Writer

Everyone wants to communicate effectively, so here are some helpful tips to take your writing to the next level. You will need reading material, a pen or pencil, a notebook, a dictionary and the ability to handle constructive criticism.

Step 1. Read as often as you can. Reading other people's work is one of the best ways to learn more about writing. And it can inspire you, too. Read books you like as well as books that are recommended to you. Venture into other styles and genres.

Step 2. Research before you write. Develop a broad knowledge of your subject to bring out the best in your writing.

Step 3. Find ways to build your vocabulary. Sign up for word of the day e-mails or crossword puzzles. If you run across a word you don't know, look it up in a dictionary.

Step 4. Simplify your writing. Learn to cut out extra words and sentences that don't add anything.

Step 5. Always have a notebook handy to write down ideas. Take time away from the computer to write in your notebook, which may free up your writing.

Step 6. Get your work critiqued by giving it to trusted friends, mentors, and teachers to read. Pick people who you know will be honest with you. Once you find someone who gives good notes, develop a relationship with them. Here's a little known fact: Emily Dickinson only published seven of her 1,700 poems during her lifetime.